Posts Tagged ‘welding’

Welding Explained

March 9, 2010
Rick Montoya, Welding Aluminum Forging

Rick Montoya, Welding Aluminum Forging

Rick Montoya, president of Valencia Welding, Inc., has worked at Santa Clarita Valley’s Industrial Park for almost 30 years and has done welding with a variety of metals during that time span, from steel, stainless steel, aluminum, and even titanium alloys in aerospace applications.  Unbeknown to me, a non-welding techie, it turns out that there are many, many ways to stick two pieces of metal together.  I won’t give you the earful that Rick gave me, but a small primer about what holds your copper pipes together as well as the titanium tubes in the B-2 Bomber, is forthcoming.

Please retweetWelding has come a long way in a very short time span.  Even as recently as the end of the 1800s, welding consisted of one process alone: forge welding, the process in which blacksmiths joined metals together by heating and hammering them.  However, by the start of World War I, a demand for reliable and inexpensive joining methods brought forth new arc welding and related processes.  The Space Age in the 1950s demanded precision, giving birth to laser beam and electron beam welding. By the turn of the 21st century, the industry had a wide array of welding processes at their disposal.

I alluded to a specific type of welding, but generally speaking, what is welding?  It is a fabrication process that joins materials, such as metals or thermoplastics, by causing coalescence and is usually done by melting the parts with a filler material, forming a pool of molten material that, when cool, becomes a strong joint, depending on the metals used.  On the other hand, the titanium welds that Rick has performed were done in a Spacetron Vacuum Chamber at Spacetron Metal Bellows, a provider of complex, titanium bellows and precision-welded titanium structures for the aerospace industry, where Rick is Chief Operating Officer (COO).

If I didn’t drink so much coffee, I’d have the steady welder’s hand that he has.

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Francis M. Unson

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New Welding Technology Unveiled by Cuban Railroad Company

February 25, 2010

The Cuban railway company, SOLCAR, has introduced cost-saving welding technology designed to enhance the safety of the country’s railroads.  While SOLCAR does not give specifics about the new technology, they do state that rail welding operations will take a third of the time it currently take.  Beginning in the second half of this year, SOLCAR will receive 12.5m and 25m rail segments and weld them into 300m rail segments. Read more

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Francis M. Unson

Twitter: The anatomy of a Tweet for SMB promotion

January 25, 2010

Please retweetDisclosure: Valencia Welding, Inc. is a client.

Twitter has much promise in promoting small and medium businesses (SMB), which can use as much promoting and marketing across a widespread social media network as possible. How, then, should SMB’s produce compact, yet effective, messages, or Tweets, to promote themselves?

Example Tweet Unlabeled

Example Tweet Unlabeled

The Tweet, above, is one of a variety of Tweets that I use to promote my client, Valencia Welding, Inc. in Santa Clarita, California. To the untrained eye, the Tweet is intimidating, but if you befriend, or “follow”, other Twitter users that are very well-versed and knowledgeable in the use of Twitter (I recommend @TweetSmarter or @anthonystevens4), you will learn a lot about the medium. Below, I break down each part of the Tweet and why it is important.

Anatomy of a Tweet for SMB promotion

Anatomy of a Tweet for SMB promotion

“Client’s business name as a hashtag.” A hashtag is a word or phrase, preceded by a pound (#) sign, that allows it to be seen in Twitter’s public timeline. Furthermore, hashtags effectively index the word or phrase and allow it to be searched easily. Note that #ValenciaWelding is contained within a single hashtag with no spaces. If I attempted to create a hashtag in the following manner (#Valencia Welding, with a space in between), the hashtag would apply to “Valencia” but not “Welding”.

“City where business is located.” This is self-explanatory. I used up to five hashtags for the location of the client’s business because Valencia Welding is located in the community of Valencia, within the city limits of Santa Clarita Valley, CA. Locally, the city is referred to as “SCV”.

“Promoting the client as a Small and Medium Business.” This is also self-explanatory.

“Link to a blog with more information about the client.” The number of characters allowed for Tweets is limited to 140 characters, making Twitter a great medium for generating buzz. Like reading a newspaper, Tweets serve as attention-grabbing headlines, and a blog is the best place to give more information about the client.

“Twitter username of the social media company promoting the client.” My company’s username, @FlowerBlossoms, serves as a signature at the end of the Tweet.

Lastly, notice that I circled the number “33” at the upper right corner of the text box. That is the remaining number of characters allowed for the Tweet out of 140 characters. It is important that your Tweets are no more than 120 characters in length so that other people can forward, or “Re-Tweet”, your message to their followers.

If you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please drop me a line.

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Francis M. Unson

Valencia Welding: Interview with Rick Montoya, President (part 2)

January 21, 2010
  1. Please retweetWhat niche are you serving with your business?
    The niche of Valencia Welding is a quick turnaround to work closely with our customers to get their product completed.
  2. What products and/or services do you offer?
    We offer welding and fabricating services.
  3. What kind of promotions do you have?
    N/A
  4. What do you like about working in the Santa Clarita Valley?
    I love working in the Santa Clarita Valley.  The people and businesses are great.  We are like a big family.
  5. In terms of your business, what are you looking forward to in the coming year?
    I am looking forward to expanding the business into the Antelope and San Fernando Valleys as well as working together with the Welding Department at the College of the Canyons (COC) to train welders for this type of welding.

    (to be continued…)

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Francis M. Unson

Valencia Welding, Inc.: An Inside Look

January 5, 2010

Please retweetThe Valencia, CA-based company, which looks forward to helping local restaurants make kitchen repairs and keep costs down in lieu of replacing kitchen appliances with on-site repairs, wants to give people an opportunity see the kind of work they can expect.

Preparing the installation of the stainless steel backing

Preparing the stainless steel backing for installation

The kitchen at the meeting hall of Our Lady Of Perpetual Help Catholic Church required the expedited installation of stainless steel steam tables in time for the first day of school after Winter Break on Monday, January 4, 2010. Here are a few snapshots of what went into installing the tables:

Installation of the copper draining system

Installation of the copper draining system

The stainless steel steam table, installed

The stainless steel steam table, fully installed

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Francis M. Unson