Posts Tagged ‘Philippines’

24 American Military Memorials and Cemeteries Around the World You Don’t Know About

May 30, 2011

Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died serving our nation. So many people have given up their lives in order to defend our rights, not only in the United States but in countries all over the world. American military memorials and cemeteries have been set up in many of these countries such as France, Germany, and Japan among others. Here is a list of the 24 military memorials and cemeteries that have been recognized throughout the world:

  1. Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Memorial | Belleau, France

    Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Memorial. Courtesy: Roger Davies

    The 42.5-acre Aisne-Marne Cemetery and Memorial in France (map), sits at the foot of the hill where Belleau Wood stands with its headstones lying in a sweeping curve. The cemetery contains the graves of 2,289 war dead, most of whom fought in the vicinity and in the Marne valley in the summer of 1918 during WWI.

  2. The approach drive at Ardennes American Cemetery and Memorial in Belgium (map) leads to the memorial, a stone structure bearing on its façade a massive American eagle and other sculptures. Within are the chapel, three large wall maps composed of inlaid marbles, marble panels depicting combat and supply activities and other ornamental features.
  3. The Brittany American Cemetery and Memorial in France (map) covers 28 acres of rolling farm country near the eastern edge of Brittany and contains the remains of 4,410 of our war dead, most of whom lost their lives in the Normandy and Brittany campaigns of 1944 during WWII inscribed along the retaining wall of the memorial terrace are inscribed the names of 498 of the missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.
  4. Brookwood American Cemetery and Memorial. Courtesy: Kevin C. Fitzpatrick

    The 4.5 acre Brookwood American Cemetery and Memorial in England (map) lies to the west of the large civilian cemetery built by the London Necropolis Co. and contains the graves of 468 of our military dead. Close by are military cemeteries and monuments of the British Commonwealth and other allied nations. Automobiles may drive through the Commonwealth or civilian cemeteries to the American cemetery.

  5. The Cambridge American Cemetery and Memorial site in England (map), 30.5 acres in total, was donated by the University of Cambridge. It lies on a slope with the west and south sides framed by woodland. The cemetery contains the remains of 3,812 of our military dead; 5,127 names are recorded on the Tablets of the Missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified. Most died in the Battle of the Atlantic or in the strategic air bombardment of northwest Europe.
  6. Corozal American Cemetery and Memorial is located approximately 3 miles north from Panama City, Panama (map) in the city of Corozal and is the location of 5,336 American veterans and others. A paved walk leads from the Visitor Center to a small memorial that sits atop a knoll overlooking the graves area. The memorial was established in 1923 by Congress to remember people that served overseas since 1917. It consists of a paved plaza with a 12-foot rectangular granite obelisk flanked by two flagpoles on which fly the United States and Panamanian flags.
  7. Epinal American Cemetery and Memorial

    Epinal American Cemetery and Memorial. Courtesy: Christian Amet

    Epinal American Cemetery and Memorial is a United States military cemetery in Dinozé, France (map). The 48.6 acres (19.7 ha) site rests on a plateau 100 feet (30 m) above the Moselle River in the foothills of the Vosges Mountains. It contains the graves of 5,255 of the United States’ military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the campaigns across northeastern France to the Rhine and beyond into Germany during World War II.

  8. The Flanders Field American Cemetery and Memorial in Belgium (map) occupies a 6.2-acre site. Masses of graceful trees and shrubbery frame the burial area and screen it from passing traffic. At the ends of the paths leading to three of the corners of the cemetery are circular retreats, with benches and urns. At this peaceful site rest 368 of our military dead, most of whom gave their lives in liberating the soil of Belgium in World War I. Their headstones are aligned in four symmetrical areas around the white stone chapel that stands in the center of the cemetery.
  9. The Florence American Cemetery and Memorial site in Italy (map) covers 70 acres, chiefly on the west side of the Greve “torrente.” The wooded hills that frame its west limit rise several hundred feet. Between the two entrance buildings, a bridge leads to the burial area where the headstones of 4,402 of our military dead are arrayed in symmetrical curved rows upon the hillside.
  10. Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial

    Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial. Courtesy: U.S. Gov't

    The Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial in Liège, Belgium (map), contains the graves of 7,992 members of the American military who died in World War II.

  11. The Lorraine American Cemetery and Memorial in France (map) covers 113.5 acres and contains the largest number of graves of our military dead of World War II in Europe, a total of 10,489. Their headstones are arranged in nine plots in a generally elliptical design extending over the beautiful rolling terrain of eastern Lorraine and culminating in a prominent overlook feature. Most of the dead here were killed while driving the German forces from the fortress city of Metz toward the Siegfried Line and the Rhine River.
  12. The Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial in Luxembourg City, Luxembourg (map), 50.5 acres in extent, is situated in a beautiful wooded area. The cemetery was established on December 29, 1944 by the 609th Quartermaster Company of the U.S. Third Army while Allied Forces were stemming the enemy’s desperate Ardennes Offensive, one of the critical battles of World War II. The city of Luxembourg served as headquarters for General George S. Patton’s U.S. Third Army. General Patton is buried here.
  13. Manila American Cemetery and Memorial

    Manila American Cemetery and Memorial. Courtesy: Roger Davies

    The Manila American Cemetery and Memorial is located in Fort Bonifacio, Taguig City in Metro Manila, Philippines (map) and contains the graves of 17,206 members of the American military.

  14. Within the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial in France (map), which covers 130.5 acres, rest the largest number of our military dead in Europe, a total of 14,246. Most of those buried here lost their lives during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive of World War I.
  15. The Mexico City National Cemetery (mapwas established in 1851 by Congress to gather the American dead of the Mexican-American War that lay in the nearby fields and to provide burial space for Americans that died in the vicinity. A small monument marks the common grave of 750 unidentified American dead of the War of 1847.
  16. Netherlands American Cemetery and Memorial

    Netherlands American Cemetery and Memorial. Courtesy: Dennis Peeters

    The Netherlands American Cemetery and Memorial is the only American military cemetery in the Netherlands (mapand contains the graves of 8,301 members of the American military. The cemetery site has a rich historical background, lying near the famous Cologne-Boulogne highway built by the Romans and used by Caesar during his campaign in that area.

  17. The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial is a World War II cemetery and memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, Normandy, France (map), that honors American soldiers who died in Europe during World War II.
  18. At the 27-acre North Africa American Cemetery and Memorial in Tunisia (map) rest 2,841 of our military dead, their headstones set in straight lines subdivided into 9 rectangular plots by wide paths, with decorative pools at their intersections.
  19. Oise-Aisne American Cemetery and Memorial

    Oise-Aisne American Cemetery and Memorial. Courtesy: ABMC

    The Oise-Aisne American Cemetery and Memorial is an American military cemetery in northern France (map). Plots A through D contains the graves of 6,012 American soldiers who died while fighting in this vicinity during World War I, 597 of which were not identified, as well as a monument for 241 Americans who were missing in action during battles in the same area and whose remains were never recovered. Included among the soldiers here who lost their lives is poet Joyce Kilmer.

  20. The site of the Rhone American Cemetery and Memorial in France (map)  was selected because of its historic location along the route of the U.S. Seventh Army’s drive up the Rhone Valley. It was established on August 19, 1944 after the Seventh Army’s surprise landing in southern France.
  21. Sicily-Rome American Cemetery and Memorial

    Sicily-Rome American Cemetery and Memorial. Courtesy: Stephen Sommerhalter

    The Sicily-Rome American Cemetery and Memorial site in Italy (map)  covers 77 acres, rising in a gentle slope from a broad pool with an island and cenotaph flanked by groups of Italian cypress trees.

  22. The Somme American Cemetery and Memorial in France (map)  is sited on a gentle slope typical of the open, rolling Picardy countryside. The 14.3-acre cemetery contains the graves of 1,844 of our military dead.
  23. The St. Mihiel American Cemetery and Memorial in France (map) , 40.5 acres in extent, contains the graves of 4,153 of our military dead. The majority of these died in the offensive that resulted in the reduction of the St. Mihiel salient that threatened Paris.
  24. Originally a World War I cemetery, the Suresnes American Cemetery and Memorial just outside Paris, France (map)  now shelters the remains of U.S. dead of both wars. The 7.5-acre cemetery contains the remains of 1,541 Americans who died in World War I and 24 Unknown dead of World War II.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Joie Montoya
Advertisements

Recent Eruptions in the Philippines

February 28, 2011

Mount Bulusan, a volcano located near the capital city of Manila, erupted on February 21, 2011.  The eruption sent thick, dark smoke into the sky and caused a shower of rocks in the immediate area.  The huge eruption covered the town of Irosin as well as four farming towns in the Sorsogon Province.  The dark cloud cover has made it impossible for light to pass through, causing zero visibility in the town of Irosin.  Despite zero visibility, officials checked the town for any damages or casualties, none of which have been reported so far.

Mount Bulusan, a volcano located near the capital city of Manila in the Philippines, has erupted, sending dark smoke into the sky and causing a shower of rocks in the immediate area.Ever since November of last year, multiple steam-driven blasts have occurred at Mount Bulusan, which has led Chief Volcanologist, Renato Solidum, to believe that eruptions will continue in the next few weeks.  This volcano is located in what is known as “The Ring of Fire”, amongst 23 other active volcanoes along the edge of the Pacific Plate.  This tragic event has forced over 1,000 people to head to emergency shelters although there have not been any government-ordered evacuations in the communities near the volcano.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Taylor P.

MagicJack: How to Call Internationally for Free

March 22, 2010

Why didn’t I call this blog,

“MagicJack: How to Make International Calls for Free”?

I consider making an international call the following: picking up the phone, dialing 011, and then the rest of the phone number.  I have some bad news: it is nigh impossible to make free international calls this way, with any telephone device.

If you want to call your friends or family overseas for free, using a MagicJack can help you make calling internationally for free.However, there is a way to call internationally for free.  For example, if you’ve called customer service of, say, your cable or credit card company, some of those calls reached India, the Philippines, or even Argentina.  Even though your call to customer service started with a toll-free 800 number, the call to the call centers in different countries were, no doubt, international.

How do you call internationally for free?  First, a list of items you need:

  • MagicJack
  • Computer
  • Internet Connection, preferably high-speed or broadband
  • A regular phone

Here are the instructions for account setup:

  1. Purchase a MagicJack.  They are available in many places such as department stores, office supply stores, and even gas station mini marts.  Trust me, I saw the MagicJack being sold side-by-side with cigarettes at 7-11.  They retail between US$20-$40 but are worth the initial investment.
  2. Turn on your computer.  Install the MagicJack in an open USB port.  The device will connect to the company’s main server, download additional files and begin setup.  Do not install the regular phone into the MagicJack at this time.
  3. If you are so inclined during setup, you may choose to register a second MagicJack, opt to start with a five-year contract immediately for additional savings, or order vanity phone numbers.  For the sake of these instructions, decline these offers.  You will also be offered pre-paid minutes for international calls.  Decline this offer.
  4. When choosing a phone number, provide your city, state, and area code.  A phone number will be assigned and will become the phone number local to your area.
  5. Once setup is complete, plug the phone into the MagicJack.  Incoming calls test: Call the new phone number from your landline or cell phone.  Outgoing calls test: Call your landline or cell phone from the phone connected to the MagicJack.
  6. This is the most important stepMail the MagicJack and phone to your friend or family member overseas.  All they have to do is connect the MagicJack to a USB port in their computer.  Once the software is installed, they can make their own calls back home using the log in information you provided during setup, and all calls will appear local.

The MagicJack can save you a lot of money, especially if you call friends or relatives in different countries very frequently.  You must setup MagicJack correctly, however, so that you and your friends and relatives can call and receive calls internationally for free.  The MagicJack may even provide you with new ways to connect with parts of the world where the cost of telecommunications is very high.  Calling internationally for free with the MagicJack couldn’t be more simple.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Francis M. Unson

Filipino food – Too slow to assimilate into the mainstream?

February 25, 2010

Filipino food has not assimilated into mainstream American cuisine.  Why not?Despite the high position of many of the top Los Angeles chefs, many of whom are Filipino and grew up on Filipino food, few traces of Filipino food can be found in the restaurants they work for or own.  The private kitchens of these chefs churn out dish after ethnic dish for their families or private company, but diners at the restaurants would find no such dishes.  Marvin Gapultos, a Filipino-American food blogger, cites the geography of the Philippines as a factor of the lack of a unifying dish, where “there are 7,000 ways to make [adobo]”.  The history of the Philippines offers glimpses into the foreign influences that shape what Filipino cuisine is today: Indonesian and Malaysian cultures brought biko and suman; the Chinese, lumpia and pancit, the Mexicans, tamarind, chiles, and chocolate; and the Americans, hot dogs, spaghetti, and Spam.  Read more

If Filipinos can assimilate into other dominant cultures (Spaniards brought Roman Catholicism and the Latin script; the Americans brought English), why has Filipino food not yet assimilated into mainstream American cuisine?

Related: Recipes for chicken adobo

Mom’s nilaga

Auntie Fe’s bichu-bichu

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Francis M. Unson

Singing Frank Sinatra’s “My Way” banned at karaoke bars due to violence?

February 8, 2010

The Philippines has seen a steady increase in violence in karaoke bars across the country over the last few years over, of all things, peoples’ renditions of Frank Sinatra’s version of “My Way”.  New York Times wondered if “the killings [are] the natural byproduct of the country’s culture of violence, drinking and machismo” or if the song contained “something inherently sinister”.  Whatever the reason, many karaoke bars have taken drastic action and removed the song from the songbooks.  Karaoke bar regulars, in turn, have shunned the song and refuse to sing it for fear of sparking new violence.  Some songwriters have noted that the song’s lyrics imply arrogance almost never observed in the country’s social norms.  Locals, however, point out that Filipinos take karaoke and singing very seriously and are quick to show their displeasure if a person is even slightly off-key.  Read more

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Francis M. Unson