Posts Tagged ‘NASA’

Through the Troposphere, Stratosphere, Thermosphere and into Outer Space!

January 27, 2011

When someone brings up the topic of aerospace, what usually comes to mind?  It is not a commonly discussed subject for most people.  It’s understandable because, over the years, aerospace has waxed and waned in popularity.  Aerospace was a frequent topic of discussion as I was growing up since my father, president of Spacetron Metal Bellows, was in the Aerospace Industry.  Hearing about the shuttle launches, new launch vehicle ideas, and satellite landings were not out of the ordinary for me.  I find aerospace very interesting but misunderstood in its importance.  Many people think that investing time or money in aerospace is unnecessary.  They don’t see the benefits that result from years of research and development that scientists and engineers have put into it.  The truth is, there are many short- and long-term benefits that result from learning about aerospace.  For example, the people who have been able to obtain jobs in this field have conducted experiments such as growing vegetation in space or testing different vaccines.  They also discovered a new outlook on travel.

The popularity of and support for aerospace has waxed and waned over the years due to the economy and administration in the White House.  The discoveries made by going into space won't end with the Space Shuttle's final flight.Space travel has expanded greatly over the years.  It started off as a simple dream to, one day, fly into the open sky.  Before long, we pushed our limits and sought to go as high as possible.  Finally, we went past the sky and entered into a whole new world: outer space.  We achieved spaceflight by breaking it down into different phases.  Starting with spaceports, engineers were able to test space vehicles and come to conclusions about how they would be launched.  With the space vehicles completed, launch pads were prepared next.  After everything was ready, it was time for lift-off.  The space vehicle launched into the air, achieving very high velocities, and broke through the atmosphere.  With the development of a fleet of Space Shuttles, we were fortunate enough to go into space quite frequently.  According to the Associated Press article by Seth Borenstein, the 135th and last shuttle flight will take place this year.  Although it may be the last time the Space Shuttle takes flight, it doesn’t mean that space flight ends here.  Advances in technology will allow us to travel to space faster and cheaper than before, as well as make new discoveries, so get ready.  You could be the next one visiting outer space!

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Joie Montoya

Gabrielle Giffords: Her Recovery

January 26, 2011

On January 8, 2011, Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords was shot in the head in Casas Adobes, Arizona.  The shooting took place during her first “Congress on Your Corner” gathering of the year.  Gabrielle was quickly rushed to the University Medical Center at Tucson.  On her way there, she was conscious and able to respond to commands.  Upon arriving at the hospital, she was put into surgery where part of her skull was removed to reduce swelling and to avoid further damage to the brain.  The bullet crossed through her head and exited, which was actually a good sign because most of the bullet’s energy was expended in its trajectory.

Arizona Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords is on the road to recovery following the January 8, 2011 shooting.Mark Kelly, Giffords’ husband, flew from Houston to Tucson with their kids to see his wife as soon as he heard the news.  Gabrielle Giffords was placed in a medically induced coma to allow her brain to rest.  When she was awakened periodically, she was able to signal with her hands and move both arms.  She cannot speak, however, since she is on a ventilator.  On January 12th, she opened her eyes for the first time.  Giffords started some simple physical therapy, such as sitting up with the assistance of hospital staff and moving her legs on command.  On January 15th, a tracheotomy was performed on Giffords’ throat to replace the ventilator with a smaller one to help with independent breathing.  Doctors believe she will recover, although her recovery may take from several months to over one year.

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Taylor P.

 

Spacetron Metal Bellows

July 1, 2010

You may have noticed that for three weeks in June, I did not write a new blog entry.  I spent those three weeks designing a new website for Spacetron Metal Bellows from the ground up.  The previous web “design”, ill-conceived and put together on-the-fly, no longer served the needs of the company.  The new web design has fewer HTML pages but displays more pictures, information, and even a new social media interface with Flower Blossoms.

Rick Montoya: co-founder of Flower Blossoms, President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Spacetron Metal Bellows

Rick Montoya, President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Spacetron Metal Bellows

Even though I updated Spacetron Metal Bellows’ website to conform with current web design principles and practices, the purpose of Spacetron Metal Bellows has remained the same since the company’s founding in 1982.  Rick Montoya, President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Spacetron Metal Bellows (as well as co-founder of Flower Blossoms), founded the Santa Clarita company

“[T]o serve the aerospace industry in the process of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), specializing in titanium assemblies, bellow assemblies, and vacuum chambers.”

The company’s work, during the first ten years of business, focused on hardware for the B-1 Bomber and NASA’s Space Shuttle programs.  Subsequently, Rockwell International awarded the company with two contracts:

Spacetron Metal Bellows has served a long list of aerospace clients, designing and building Spacetron Vacuum Chambers to the client’s specifications, fabricating and welding titanium structures, and providing many complex assemblies.

The company’s website provides an abridged list of projects involving Rick Montoya and Spacetron Metal Bellows.  Trust me; compiling an unabridged list is itself a project .  Nonetheless, very small snippet of projects that Rick has worked on includes NASA’s Hyper-X, the B-1 Bomber, MX missile, Space Shuttle, Airborne Laser (ABL), F-35, and NASA’s Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) program with Rocketplane Kistler (RPK).  Even though he specialized in welding nuclear piping assemblies, he has expanded his capabilities in welding materials such as titanium, Inconel, stainless steel, aluminum, and bellows assemblies.  28 years in business has allowed him to build an extensive supplier network and take on challenging projects with confidence.  If your company has a welding project that requires additional consulting, contact Rick Montoya.  The added value he provides may save your company hundreds of thousands, or even millions, of dollars.

Spacetron Metal Bellows was founded in 1982 to serve the aerospace industry in the process of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), specializing in titanium assemblies, bellow assemblies, and vacuum chambers. Rick Montoya serves as President and Chief Operating Officer (COO).

Rick Montoya, President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Spacetron Metal Bellows
Corporate Office
25136 Anza Dr.
Valencia, CA 91355

Ph (Direct): 661.312.2193
Ph (Office): 661.294.9018
rick [AT] spacetronmetalbellows [DOT] com

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Francis M. Unson

The Public Launch of a “Private” Space Plane

April 23, 2010

Please retweet

The United States Air Force launches a spacecraft, but mission details and even its duration remain a mystery.

The evening of April 22 marked the launch of the United State Air Force’s spacecraft, the X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle, into space to test “a new batch of reusable technologies”, according to Gary Payton, deputy undersecretary of the Air Force space program.  Launched into space using an Atlas V rocket booster from Cape Canaveral in Florida, the test vehicle will undergo a demonstration mission.  Payton, however, would not go into further detail about the length of the mission or what exactly the demonstration will entail.  Following the mission’s end, the craft will land at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.  Following the renewed commitment of the government to the U.S. space program, we can expect more aerospace-related activity in the near future.

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Francis M. Unson

Space Exploration’s New Frontier: Social Media

March 19, 2010

Space Exploration's New Frontier: Social MediaSocial media, seemingly the domain of earth-bound people such as myself, has had many enthusiasts in the U.S. space program since 2008.  Veronica McGregor of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and other panelists addressed the topic of space exploration as a social experience at the South by Southwest (SXSW) Festival.  In fact, a number of astronauts live Tweet from space such as @Astro_mike, @Astro_soichi, and @Astro_Jeff.  (By all means, follow them on Twitter!)

Panelist Nick Skytland, co-founder of openNasa.com, a collaborative experiment in open, transparent and direct communication about the U.S. space program, has recognized the benefits of bringing discussions about space exploration into the channels of public conversation such as Facebook.com/NASA.gov, @NASA, and their OpenNASA.com blog.  Skytland’s current push across channels encourages participation in President Barack Obama’s open government initiative, which urges citizens to communicate directly with lawmakers about issues and programs that matter to them.

Panelist Amanda Stiles, online community manager and Google Liaison for the Google Lunar X Prize, stressed making today’s generation excited about space exploration.  Dave Masten, private entrepreneur, discussed working on a more sustainable way to make trips to the moon and encouraged this generation to become scientists and engineers so that the U.S. stays on the space exploration forefront.  Read more

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Francis M. Unson

The Mars Rover, Spirit, no longer roams the Red Planet

January 26, 2010

Spirit, the first of the two rovers of NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Mission, will remain a static science station after efforts to extricate it from soft soil, and two of its six wheels, have failed.  Mission control plans to tilt the rover in a way that will maximize the amount of sunlight falling on its solar panels during the winter months.  However, because of the small amount of energy that the batteries can store, the rover will “hibernate” in April and emerge in August or September, when the sun is high in the Martian sky.  Read more

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Francis M. Unson