Posts Tagged ‘latissimus dorsi’

Wii Sports Warm-Ups, Part 5: Boxing

March 23, 2010

The fifth and final blog in the Wii Sports Warm-Ups series involves Wii Boxing and the muscles involved in real-life boxing.  The physically demanding sport requires warming up and exercising a considerable array of muscle groups spanning almost the entire length of the person’s body, from the shoulder and neck muscles to the upper leg muscles.  Three-minute rounds of fighting, interrupted by 30 or 60-second rest breaks between rounds, demands aerobic and anaerobic conditioning so that boxers could last 12 or 15 rounds.  Body conditioning involves developing upper and lower body strength as well as good hand-eye coordination and spatial awareness.

The fifth and final blog in the Wii Sports Warm-Ups series involves Wii Boxing and the muscles involved in real-life boxing.Much of the wear and tear that takes place on the body during boxing occurs in the upper torso area, so boxers focus on strengthening the core muscles in order to absorb punches to the body.

Target muscle groups

Core muscles

Offensively, the act of punching and the subsequent impact requires conditioning the shoulder, neck, arm, and hand muscles.

Shoulder and neck muscles

Deltoids

Latissimus dorsi

Pectoralis Major

Sternocleidomastoid

Trapezius

Teres major and minor

Arm muscles

Biceps brachii and Triceps brachii

Hand muscles

  • Palmaris longus
  • Abductor pollicis brevis
  • Flexor pollicis brevis

The following video contains a series hand, finger, and forearm exercises for martial artists, and boxing, as a martial art, is no exception.  The exercises highlighted in the video strengthens the hand muscles listed above.

Why work out the legs in a sport that seems not to use them?  A good amount of the power in a boxer’s punch comes from their lower body.  Working out the upper leg muscles and hips helps boxers develop more explosive punches.

Upper leg muscles and hips

Quadriceps

Hamstrings

First-time players of Wii Boxing found themselves the most sore (and out-of-shape) out of all five sports available in Wii Sports.  Whether you’re a virtual Wii boxer or a real boxer, warming up the muscle groups outlined in this blog will help you reduce injuries, increase your endurance, and get the most out of the athleticism that virtual and real boxing needs.

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Francis M. Unson

Wii Sports Warm-Ups, Part 4: Golf

March 12, 2010

The fourth blog in the Wii Sports Warm-Ups series involves Wii Golf, the muscle groups involved in playing golf, and warm-up and strength-training exercises that work those muscles.

The fourth blog in the Wii Sports Warm-Ups series involves Wii Golf, the muscle groups involved in playing golf, and warm-up and strength-training exercises that work those muscles.When one mentions golf, many people picture an individual on a green golf course with a bag full of golf clubs and hitting a golf ball from a tee or on the green towards a cup marked with a flag.  What many people do not connect, however, is the athleticism involved, especially because there is almost no running involved, except by the spectators of a tournament when an errant tee shot comes their way.  Golfers, it turns out, must work out in the gym in order to improve their game and reduce the chances of injury.  Indeed, a lot of consideration goes into making the first tee shot.

According to Mike Pedersen, the core muscles required for stronger turns and more powerful torque include:

Target muscle groups

Hamstrings – Maintains golf posture and prevents lower back injuries.

Quadriceps – Maintains knee flex throughout the swing.

Latissimus Dorsi (upper back muscles) – Maintains firm upper spine for smoother rotation.

Deltoids (shoulder muscles) – Allows a more consistent “top-of-the-backswing” position and better club control throughout the swing.

Forearms – Maintains stronger impact position with better wrist control.

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Francis M. Unson

Wii Sports Warm-Ups, Part 2: Baseball

March 4, 2010

The second blog in the Wii Sports Warm-Ups series involves Wii Baseball, with a discussion about the muscle groups involved in playing baseball, including the muscles involved for batting and pitching.  Even though Wii Baseball does not involve running around the baseball diamond, the discussion does include the leg and lower body muscles involved.

The second blog in the Wii Sports Warm-Ups series involves Wii Baseball, and discusses the muscles, warm-ups, and conditioning involved.Batting and pitching

Arms
The proper pitch occurs in six stages: wind up, stride, arm-cocking, arm acceleration, arm deceleration, and follow-through.  The primary muscles on either side of the upper body involved in the arm movements of batting and pitching include the following:

Pectoralis Major

Posterior Deltoid
Teres Major
(diagram only)
Latissimus Dorsi

Abdominals
In order to become a consistent batter, working out the abdominal muscles is essential since batting involves a powerful twisting motion during the swing.  Batters must concentrate on strengthening the following abdominal muscles:

Leg Strength
Why is leg strength important in batting?  The batter pushes off the ground with his legs prior to swinging the bat, drawing all of the energy that goes into the full swing.  Developing the necessary leg strength requires strengthening the following:

Calves

Quadriceps

Hamstrings

Groin

Even though most of the running done by actual baseball players takes place when they run around the baseball diamond, retrieve a fly ball infield, or run after a ball outfield, people should understand how doing running drills helps increase speed and efficiency while also maximizing the potential hamstrings and quadriceps muscles.

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Francis M. Unson