Posts Tagged ‘ipv6’

IPv4 vs. IPv6: The Differences That Matter

June 27, 2011

Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) is the fourth revision in the development of the Internet Protocol (IP) and the first version of the protocol to be widely deployed.  Together with IPv6, it is at the core of standards-based internetworking methods of the Internet.  IPv4 is still, by far, the most widely deployed Internet Layer protocol.  Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is a version of the Internet Protocol (IP) that is designed to succeed Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4).  The Internet operates by transferring data in small packets that are independently routed across networks as specified by an international communications protocol known as the Internet Protocol.  Although IPv4 is still the most commonly used protocol, I want to list the differences between both so you can better understand why your company and ISP must begin making plans to migrate to IPv6.

With Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) out of IP addresses, the computer networking industry is strongly encouraging companies to migrate to Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6), which has better bandwidth efficiency, scalability, and exponentially more IP addresses at its disposal.

IPv4 has run out of IP addresses.

IPv4

  • Addresses are 32 bits (4 bytes) in length.
  • Address (A) resource records in DNS to map host names to IPv4 addresses.
  • Pointer (PTR) resource records in the IN-ADDR.ARPA DNS domain to map IPv4 addresses to host names.
  • IPSec is optional and should be supported externally
  • Header does not identify packet flow for QoS handling by routers
  • Both routers and the sending host fragment packets.
  • Header includes a checksum.
  • Header includes options.
  • ARP uses broadcast ARP request to resolve IP to MAC/Hardware address.
  • Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) manages membership in local subnet groups.
  • Broadcast addresses are used to send traffic to all nodes on a subnet.
  • Configured either manually or through DHCP.
  • Must support a 576-byte packet size (possibly fragmented).
With Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) out of IP addresses, the computer networking industry is strongly encouraging companies to migrate to Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6), which has better bandwidth efficiency, scalability, and exponentially more IP addresses at its disposal.

IPv6 is the successor to IPv4, but deployment has been slow.

IPv6

  • Addresses are 128 bits (16 bytes) in length
  • Address (AAAA) resource records in DNS to map host names to IPv6 addresses.
  • Pointer (PTR) resource records in the IP6.ARPA DNS domain to map IPv6 addresses to host names.
  • IPSec support is not optional
  • Header contains Flow Label field, which Identifies packet flow for QoS handling by router.
  • Routers do not support packet fragmentation. Sending host fragments packets
  • Header does not include a checksum.
  • Optional data is supported as extension headers.
  • Multicast Neighbor Solicitation messages resolve IP addresses to MAC addresses.
  • Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) messages manage membership in local subnet groups.
  • IPv6 uses a link-local scope all-nodes multicast address.
  • Does not require manual configuration or DHCP.
  • Must support a 1280-byte packet size (without fragmentation).

Depending on what you are using, the IP address for either version is still valid.  There are some advantages to upgrading from IPv4 to IPv6 such as 79 octillion (that’s 27 zeros) times the IPv4 address space, better bandwidth efficiency, better efficiency and scalability, and works with the latest 3G mobile technologies and beyond.  With so many devices requiring IP addresses for Internet access, the development of a more versatile Internet Protocol was inevitable.  I hope this article helps you better understand the differences between IPv4 and IPv6 so that you can make your decision accordingly.

Juniper Networks describes in layman’s terms on a video in their YouTube channel the need for creating an IPv6 migration strategy.

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Joie Montoya

ICANN’s Big Change

June 22, 2011

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) recently approved a change in their rules for domains.  They are allowing new domain names to be launched next year.  The changes will allow up to 1,000 new web domains.  The application fee alone is $185,000, with an annual fee of $25,000.  With these new domains, the existing regime with be greatly expanded in creativity but, with the high costs, gradually.

With ICANN easing rules on domain names, the sky's the limit--as long as you can afford it.The changes will be limited to websites with these domains: .com, .net, and .org.  However, they are expected to let companies register unique website names or better protect their existing brands.  Nonprofit groups could reserve the .school domain and hand out addresses to every elementary school.  Cities could consolidate their websites to .nyc or .losangeles.  And interest groups could stake out their own corner of the Web: .car for auto enthusiasts, .law for attorneys, and .food for restaurants.  This is a big, albeit expensive, change for the Internet, but it looks as if things will go smoothly.  Companies can now have fun, creative web domains!

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Taylor P.

World IPv6 Day (via WordPress.com News)

June 10, 2011

The use of IPv4 addresses by our mobile-enabled devices has hastened the end of this Internet protocol. IPv6 will provide exponentially more IP addresses than IPv4 ever could for years to come.

World IPv6 Day To show our support for IPv6, and as part of our IPv6 migration plan, we have enabled dual stack connectivity on our blog on this occasion of World IPv6 Day. If you view this site over IPv6, you will see a visual indicator confirming access from IPv6: What's IPv6? For those of you who don't know, IPv6 is the next-generation Internet protocol, which offers a large number of IP addresses, 296 (= 79228162514264337593543950336) times of what IPv4 has … Read More

via WordPress.com News