Posts Tagged ‘I am titanium’

NADCAP Certification

June 14, 2011

The National Aerospace and Defense Contractors Accreditation Program, or Nadcap, is a global cooperative standards-setting program for aerospace engineering, defense and related industries.  The Nadcap Program, which is part of the Performance Review Institute (PRI), was created in 1990 with the purpose of coordinating industry-wide standards for special processes and products.  PRI’s mission is “to provide international, unbiased, independent manufacturing process and product assessments and certification services for the purpose of adding value, reducing total cost, and facilitating relationships between primes and suppliers.”

The National Aerospace and Defense Contractors Accreditation Program, or Nadcap, sets standards for aerospace engineering, defense and related industries. What fields do Nadcap certifications cover?

Spacetron Metal Bellow's Nadcap certification for Aerospace Quality Systems (AC7004)

In order to obtain Nadcap certification, you must complete the following steps that apply to your field of testing such as Fluid Distribution Systems (FLU), Heat Treating (HT), Materials Testing Laboratories (MTL), Non-Metallic Materials Testing (NMMT), or Non-Destructive Testing (NDT).  There are many benefits to being Nadcap-certified.  Showing that your company is Nadcap-certified tells other companies that you are ensuring that the best practices are implemented in your operations.  General quality systems are not enough to satisfy requirements in chemical processing, heat treating, welding, coatings, laboratory testing, NDT, painting, and other processes.  Nadcap goes much farther in ensuring the quality of specific operations based on best practices.  Although receiving Nadcap certification can be a lengthy process, in the end, certifying your company will guarantee more work for your company and happy customers that may very well provide that work in the future.

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Joie Montoya
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Through the Troposphere, Stratosphere, Thermosphere and into Outer Space!

January 27, 2011

When someone brings up the topic of aerospace, what usually comes to mind?  It is not a commonly discussed subject for most people.  It’s understandable because, over the years, aerospace has waxed and waned in popularity.  Aerospace was a frequent topic of discussion as I was growing up since my father, president of Spacetron Metal Bellows, was in the Aerospace Industry.  Hearing about the shuttle launches, new launch vehicle ideas, and satellite landings were not out of the ordinary for me.  I find aerospace very interesting but misunderstood in its importance.  Many people think that investing time or money in aerospace is unnecessary.  They don’t see the benefits that result from years of research and development that scientists and engineers have put into it.  The truth is, there are many short- and long-term benefits that result from learning about aerospace.  For example, the people who have been able to obtain jobs in this field have conducted experiments such as growing vegetation in space or testing different vaccines.  They also discovered a new outlook on travel.

The popularity of and support for aerospace has waxed and waned over the years due to the economy and administration in the White House.  The discoveries made by going into space won't end with the Space Shuttle's final flight.Space travel has expanded greatly over the years.  It started off as a simple dream to, one day, fly into the open sky.  Before long, we pushed our limits and sought to go as high as possible.  Finally, we went past the sky and entered into a whole new world: outer space.  We achieved spaceflight by breaking it down into different phases.  Starting with spaceports, engineers were able to test space vehicles and come to conclusions about how they would be launched.  With the space vehicles completed, launch pads were prepared next.  After everything was ready, it was time for lift-off.  The space vehicle launched into the air, achieving very high velocities, and broke through the atmosphere.  With the development of a fleet of Space Shuttles, we were fortunate enough to go into space quite frequently.  According to the Associated Press article by Seth Borenstein, the 135th and last shuttle flight will take place this year.  Although it may be the last time the Space Shuttle takes flight, it doesn’t mean that space flight ends here.  Advances in technology will allow us to travel to space faster and cheaper than before, as well as make new discoveries, so get ready.  You could be the next one visiting outer space!

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Joie Montoya

Staying sharp: Welders battle for supremacy

September 17, 2010

Please retweetWelding companies such as Valencia Welding in Santa Clarita, CA, compete with other companies in Southern California that provide similar services.  Not only can company president, Rick Montoya, and his team provide welding services in aluminum and copper but, as his “resume” shows, in more exotic materials like titanium, as well.  What can up-and-coming welders of today do to build a skill set and impressive clientele list as detailed as Mr. Montoya’s?

A good head start would be to take part in FABTECH 2010, North America’s largest metal forming, fabricating, finishing and welding event, which takes place in Atlanta, GA, from November 2-4, 2010.  While around 22,000 attendees are expected to descend on Georgia World Congress Center and visit the 1,000 exhibiting companies during the three-day conference and trade show, the event that attendees should not miss is the American Welding Society-sponsored 2010 Weld-Off Competition.  Out of 24 student welders that competed in SkillsUSA Championships 2009 and 2010, six will face off in a series of contests and only three will advance to the WorldSkills Competition in 2011, in London.

Armed with contest drawings that conform with the latest editions of American Welding Society standards, student welders are tested on the following aspects of welding:

  • measuring weld replicas using weld measuring gauges
  • laying out a plate and using oxyacetylene equipment to cut several holes checked for accuracy and quality
  • gas metal arc welding on steel making welds in various positions using short circuiting transfers
  • flux cored arc welding using a shielding gas, making welds in various positions
  • using a combination machine capable of providing the correct welding current for shielded metal arc and gas tungsten arc welding.

Welding competitions and trade shows will make sure that North America remains competitive in the welding industry on a global scale, particularly by producing high-quality welders that can complement Valencia Welding.

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Francis M. Unson

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Spacetron Metal Bellows – “Aerospace Welding Apprentice Program”

July 3, 2010

Rick Montoya, President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Spacetron Metal Bellows in Santa Clarita, California, wants to pass on the knowledge of welding to a new generation of welders who may very well design, construct, and launch hardware destined for outer space.  With that in mind, Rick created the “Aerospace Welding Apprentice Program“.

Rick Montoya, President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Spacetron Metal Bellows, created the "Aerospace Welding Apprentice Program", designed to take apprentices through a rigorous, one-year program, working on actual aerospace hardware.Spacetron Metal Bellows’ program is designed to take apprentices through a rigorous, one-year program, working on actual aerospace hardware and learning the techniques for welding groups 1-4 and 6.  Part of the apprentice’s training includes learn the techniques of titanium structures, welding bellows, tubing, ducting, hose assemblies, tanks, pressure vessels, piping and machined parts.  While the program turns apprentices into high-quality welders, companies that hire this newly forged lot benefit in many ways:

  • Allows your company to maintain its production schedule without reallocating welders/welding operators and/or QA Staff for training purposes.
  • Having the apprentice observe, learn, and prepare for the welding of the Aerospace hardware to be performed by a certified aerospace welder, Spacetron Metal Bellows.
  • Being able to meet production schedules and ship hardware to your customers, meeting all your company and NADCAP Welding requirements while the apprentice is going through the on-the-job apprentice program.
  • Able to increase new programs by adding new certified aerospace welders and/or welding operators to your company team.
  • After the completed Apprentice Program, you will have a certified aerospace welder and/or welding operators ready to join your team with the experience needed to work on your aerospace products, with the freshness to be molded into your company’s operating philosophy.

If you feel that you are ready to take on the challenges of aerospace welding, or if you’d like your employees to undergo additional training, please contact Rick Montoya.

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Francis M. Unson

Spacetron Metal Bellows

July 1, 2010

You may have noticed that for three weeks in June, I did not write a new blog entry.  I spent those three weeks designing a new website for Spacetron Metal Bellows from the ground up.  The previous web “design”, ill-conceived and put together on-the-fly, no longer served the needs of the company.  The new web design has fewer HTML pages but displays more pictures, information, and even a new social media interface with Flower Blossoms.

Rick Montoya: co-founder of Flower Blossoms, President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Spacetron Metal Bellows

Rick Montoya, President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Spacetron Metal Bellows

Even though I updated Spacetron Metal Bellows’ website to conform with current web design principles and practices, the purpose of Spacetron Metal Bellows has remained the same since the company’s founding in 1982.  Rick Montoya, President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Spacetron Metal Bellows (as well as co-founder of Flower Blossoms), founded the Santa Clarita company

“[T]o serve the aerospace industry in the process of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), specializing in titanium assemblies, bellow assemblies, and vacuum chambers.”

The company’s work, during the first ten years of business, focused on hardware for the B-1 Bomber and NASA’s Space Shuttle programs.  Subsequently, Rockwell International awarded the company with two contracts:

Spacetron Metal Bellows has served a long list of aerospace clients, designing and building Spacetron Vacuum Chambers to the client’s specifications, fabricating and welding titanium structures, and providing many complex assemblies.

The company’s website provides an abridged list of projects involving Rick Montoya and Spacetron Metal Bellows.  Trust me; compiling an unabridged list is itself a project .  Nonetheless, very small snippet of projects that Rick has worked on includes NASA’s Hyper-X, the B-1 Bomber, MX missile, Space Shuttle, Airborne Laser (ABL), F-35, and NASA’s Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) program with Rocketplane Kistler (RPK).  Even though he specialized in welding nuclear piping assemblies, he has expanded his capabilities in welding materials such as titanium, Inconel, stainless steel, aluminum, and bellows assemblies.  28 years in business has allowed him to build an extensive supplier network and take on challenging projects with confidence.  If your company has a welding project that requires additional consulting, contact Rick Montoya.  The added value he provides may save your company hundreds of thousands, or even millions, of dollars.

Spacetron Metal Bellows was founded in 1982 to serve the aerospace industry in the process of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), specializing in titanium assemblies, bellow assemblies, and vacuum chambers. Rick Montoya serves as President and Chief Operating Officer (COO).

Rick Montoya, President and Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Spacetron Metal Bellows
Corporate Office
25136 Anza Dr.
Valencia, CA 91355

Ph (Direct): 661.312.2193
Ph (Office): 661.294.9018
rick [AT] spacetronmetalbellows [DOT] com

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Francis M. Unson

Welding Explained

March 9, 2010
Rick Montoya, Welding Aluminum Forging

Rick Montoya, Welding Aluminum Forging

Rick Montoya, president of Valencia Welding, Inc., has worked at Santa Clarita Valley’s Industrial Park for almost 30 years and has done welding with a variety of metals during that time span, from steel, stainless steel, aluminum, and even titanium alloys in aerospace applications.  Unbeknown to me, a non-welding techie, it turns out that there are many, many ways to stick two pieces of metal together.  I won’t give you the earful that Rick gave me, but a small primer about what holds your copper pipes together as well as the titanium tubes in the B-2 Bomber, is forthcoming.

Please retweetWelding has come a long way in a very short time span.  Even as recently as the end of the 1800s, welding consisted of one process alone: forge welding, the process in which blacksmiths joined metals together by heating and hammering them.  However, by the start of World War I, a demand for reliable and inexpensive joining methods brought forth new arc welding and related processes.  The Space Age in the 1950s demanded precision, giving birth to laser beam and electron beam welding. By the turn of the 21st century, the industry had a wide array of welding processes at their disposal.

I alluded to a specific type of welding, but generally speaking, what is welding?  It is a fabrication process that joins materials, such as metals or thermoplastics, by causing coalescence and is usually done by melting the parts with a filler material, forming a pool of molten material that, when cool, becomes a strong joint, depending on the metals used.  On the other hand, the titanium welds that Rick has performed were done in a Spacetron Vacuum Chamber at Spacetron Metal Bellows, a provider of complex, titanium bellows and precision-welded titanium structures for the aerospace industry, where Rick is Chief Operating Officer (COO).

If I didn’t drink so much coffee, I’d have the steady welder’s hand that he has.

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Francis M. Unson