Posts Tagged ‘internet’

ICANN’s Big Change

June 22, 2011

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) recently approved a change in their rules for domains.  They are allowing new domain names to be launched next year.  The changes will allow up to 1,000 new web domains.  The application fee alone is $185,000, with an annual fee of $25,000.  With these new domains, the existing regime with be greatly expanded in creativity but, with the high costs, gradually.

With ICANN easing rules on domain names, the sky's the limit--as long as you can afford it.The changes will be limited to websites with these domains: .com, .net, and .org.  However, they are expected to let companies register unique website names or better protect their existing brands.  Nonprofit groups could reserve the .school domain and hand out addresses to every elementary school.  Cities could consolidate their websites to .nyc or .losangeles.  And interest groups could stake out their own corner of the Web: .car for auto enthusiasts, .law for attorneys, and .food for restaurants.  This is a big, albeit expensive, change for the Internet, but it looks as if things will go smoothly.  Companies can now have fun, creative web domains!

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Taylor P.

The Greatest Internet Law Turns 15

May 17, 2011

The “Greatest Internet Law” turned 15 years old this year, but few people have even heard of it.  The law says that “interactive computer services” are shielded from liability for information posted or published on their systems by users.  This means that online intermediaries have generous leeway to determine what content and commerce travels over their systems without the fear that they will be overwhelmed by lawsuits if other parties object to some of that content.

The "Greatest Internet Law" turned 15 recently. How did the law, also known as "Section 230", affect how we use the Internet today?The law is in the provision of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, also known as Section 230.  It helped foster the wide variety of informational sites that are available to us today such as message boards, community forums, shopping sites, auction services, social networking sites, messaging services, and blogs.  If not for the immunities granted by Sec. 230, online speech and commerce would have been severely stifled because of the threat of legal action.  This law is a big part of why the Internet has been such a massive success since Internet access became available to the public in 1992.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Taylor P.

The Amazon Kindle

May 4, 2011

The Amazon Kindle is a portable e-book reader.  It is a software, hardware, and network platform with built-in wireless connectivity to enable users to browse and shop for e-books, magazines, newspapers, blogs and other digital media.  The Kindle’s features include a large screen for easy reading and a small keyboard to enable search and browsing, making it easier for people to take their reading material, with them anywhere.  Amazon has also developed a 3G network for the Kindle known as Whispernet, which allows users to access internet without a monthly fee or wireless subscription.

The bulkiness of carrying a number of books or magazines has been eliminated, thanks to the Amazon Kindle, a portable e-book reader that allows you to take your library of books and periodicals anywhere you go.The Kindle has enjoyed great success.  When Amazon first released its e-reader on November 19, 2007, they were sold out within the first five and a half hours.  Although other companies have tried to create a similar product to take the spotlight from the Kindle, Amazon keeps coming up with new innovations to keep their creation on top.  In 2009, the Kindle became international reaching out to 100 other companies with help from the Sprint Network and AT&T.  The newest generation of Amazon’s e-reader, Kindle 3, includes Internet connectivity on both a 3G network and WiFi, new screen contrast to make it much easier to read, text to speech navigation and 4GB of internal memory.  If you enjoy reading or your job requires you to travel a lot, the Amazon Kindle is perfect for you because it allows you to take your whole library of favorites anywhere you go.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Joie Montoya

How much do you spend to keep your family entertained?

February 9, 2010

Please retweetDo you remember spending just $25 a month on your phone bill?  For that matter, do you remember when your “landline” was your main telecommunications expense?  By 2004, according to data from the Census Bureau, the average American spent $770.95 annually on services such as cable television, Internet connectivity, and video games.  By the end of 2008, that figure rose to $903.  By the end of this year, the figure could reach $997.07.  The government figures do not even include movies, music and television shows bought through iTunes, cellphone service, or data plans bought in addition to that service with the purchase of smartphones.  Read more

Do you think that the subscriptions and services for entertainment and communications have reached parity and became indispensable necessities of life such as electricity, water, and groceries? Do you think you could live without such forms of entertainment or telecommunications, even for one day?

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Francis M. Unson

Are you still using Internet Explorer 6?

February 2, 2010

Please retweetCiting security flaws and outdated technology, a petition is calling for the UK government to phase out Internet Explorer 6 (IE6).  While the government is reluctant to upgrade the software due to the massive task, the petition authors hope that the public would lead the drive to upgrade the web browser.  The latest campaign to do away with IE6 gained momentum recently when Google revealed that it had been a weak link in a cyber attack.  The French and German governments strongly advised its citizens to move to a different browser such as Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome until Microsoft fixed the security hole.  In response to mounting international pressure, Microsoft patched the hole in IE6 in January, three weeks ahead of schedule.  Read more

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Francis M. Unson

Wireless Security

January 26, 2010

Nowadays, we are seemingly surrounded by WiFi hotspots wherever we go in public: the library, the bookstore, even fast-food restaurants.  Do we give wireless security a second thought and find out how secure these hotspots really are?  According to most peoples’ experiences, not very secure.  Public access of wireless Internet hotspots caters to all types of users: college students, parents, and business travelers alike.  If people decide to use the Internet at these hotspots, the places hosting the WiFi hotspots and users alike should take precautions to protect the wireless network and the computers on it.

  • Precautions you should take to make your wireless network and the computers on it more secure.Use encryption to scramble communications over the network.  If you have a choice, WiFi Protected Access (WPA and WPA2) is stronger than Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP).
  • Use anti-virus and anti-spyware software, and a firewall.
  • Most wireless routers have a mechanism called identifier broadcasting.  Turn it off so your computer won’t send a signal to any device in the vicinity announcing its presence.

Read more about Wireless Security on OnGuardOnline.gov, a website maintained by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

The video, below, is a short tutorial on how to secure your Wi-Fi network:

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

 

Francis M. Unson

 

Microsoft patches Internet Explorer hole

January 22, 2010

Please retweetIf you have not done so yet, it is highly recommended that you install Microsoft’s latest update as soon as possible or update to the latest version of the web browser.  The latest patch, MS10-002, was released on Thursday, January 21.  Although Microsoft had planned to release the patch in February, the high-profile nature of the attack caused the company to release it sooner.  Read more

Microsoft Security Bulletin MS10-002 – Critical

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Francis M. Unson

140it: For the Tweet that is still too short for a blog

January 12, 2010

Please retweetTwitter’s arrival on the social networking scene has forced us to reconsider how we communicate, namely, how succinctly we can get our message across.  Sometimes, however, as much as we try to shrink a message down to under 140 characters, we still end up over the character limit.

The website, 140it, has come to the rescue.  You type your message in the text box, click on the “140 It!” button and, as much as possible, slimmer message of 140 characters or less emerges.  The application removes articles such as “a” and “the”, and swaps shortcuts such as “gr8″ for “great”, among other methods.  If you Tweet often and find yourself spending extra time shrinking down your message, bookmark 140it or add its Bookmarklet to your browser.

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Francis M. Unson

A Better Social Networking Support System in 2010?

January 5, 2010

Please retweetSometimes, I wonder what kind of support system people had before the rise of the Internet and telecommunications.  It was certainly much easier for people who lived in urban or suburban areas to gain access to support groups such as those that dealt with terminal illness, weight-loss, or quitting smoking, among many others.  However, many people who lived in rural areas were often left without such a support system, often turning to the people of their community, if they offered any help at all.

The Internet as we know it exploded in popularity since it became commercially available in 1993.  From 1993 to 2003, we made use of Web 1.0 technology, generally defined by the following characteristics:

  • Static pages instead of dynamic user-generated content.
  • The use of framesets.
  • Proprietary HTML extensions such as the <blink> and <marquee> tags introduced during the first browser war.
  • Online guestbooks.
  • GIF buttons, typically 88×31 pixels in size promoting web browsers and other products.
  • HTML forms sent via email. A user would fill in a form, and upon clicking submit their email client would attempt to send an email containing the form’s details.

From 2004 to the present, our usage of the Internet and the way we interact on it changed considerably and is duly defined within the parameters of Web 2.0 which include:

  • Search: Finding information through keyword search.
  • Links: Connects information together into a meaningful information ecosystem using the model of the Web, and provides low-barrier social tools.
  • Authoring: The ability to create and update content leads to the collaborative work of many rather than just a few web authors.  In wikis, users may extend, undo and redo each other’s work.  In blogs, posts and the comments of individuals build up over time.
  • Tags: Categorization of content by users adding one-word descriptions to facilitate searching, without dependence on pre-made categories.  This is referred to as “folksonomy”.
  • Extensions: Software that makes the Web an application platform as well as a document server.
  • Signals: The use of syndication technology such as RSS to notify users of content changes.

The technology by Web 2.0 includes “Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax), Adobe Flash, and JavaScript/Ajax frameworks such as Yahoo! UI Library, Dojo Toolkit, MooTools, and jQuery.  Ajax programming uses JavaScript to upload and download new data from the web server without undergoing a full page reload”.

People were certainly impressed with each others’ websites to varying degrees when Web 1.0 technology was here.  Alas, the technology became passé and people transitioned to newer technology.  Even before the transition, however, people have become more social as a result of the Internet.  Casual Web designers created their websites on places such as GeoCities and Angelfire (remember those websites?) with static content and waited for people to visit their websites and post a guestbook entry, perhaps fellow website designers with their own sites to promote.  Vincent Flanders archived the techniques that worked and didn’t work here.

MySpace was literally on the cusp of the transition between Web 1.0 and 2.0 as the first few million users designed and created their profiles in a similar manner as described above.  However, Facebook embraced Web 2.0 technology from the start, forcing MySpace to play catch up.  The use of an application and chat bar on the bottom of the browser window is evidence that both websites use Web 2.0 technology.

Has Web technology improved, allowing us to communicate with people in different states, provinces and countries, seemingly without borders?  While it has in many ways, the improvement has made communicating with people wherever they are from more convenient.  In other words, people have already found ways to communicate with those far and wide even when technology was, well, primitive at first.  People who feel isolated from their own communities for one reason or another have turned to the Internet to find people with whom they can communicate.  Ostensibly, the first people to use the Internet to communicate relied solely on words in bulletin board systems, or BBS, and later on, chatrooms.  Nowadays, we have YouTube, Skype, and webcam applications built into instant messenger applications to serve the same purpose although we still use chatrooms.  Meanwhile, the rise of social networking websites such as MySpace and Facebook have allowed people to find each other online more easily than ever.  If the Internet is the Wild West and we are the sheep, scattered about across vast swaths of grassy plains, social networking websites using Web 2.0 technology is the cowboy that herds us together and helps us to find each other.

What does the future hold?  I try my best to keep up with the latest technology, but even I cannot predict what is to come.  If the current use of 3-D projectors in movie theaters is a progenitor of things to come, the technology presented in the movie, “Avatar” may be the next step.  Who knows how close we already are?

Add to FacebookAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to TwitterAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Yahoo BuzzAdd to Newsvine

Francis M. Unson


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 40 other followers